Vermont Hang Gliding Association

Sugarbush

Description

With E, ESE, ENE launches, this high mountain site offer excellent XC flying.

Sugarbush’s top launch is at 3950 ft. from the summit of Lincoln Peak, Vermont’s 6th highest mountain. Sugarbush offers excellent XC flights for East or L&V days. Going over the back is easy as you have 2,800 vert. and abundant LZ options at about 5 to 1 glide. For pilots that are up to the challenge, Sugarbush offers top-notch flights. Due to its East face, Sugarbush is also ideal for morning hike and fly in calm air and morning anabatic flows.

MEETING PLACE: Sugarbush Mountain lodge, Lincoln Peak parking lot.

COORDINATES: 44.136292° -72.888013°

When the lift is operating, paragliders can purchase a lift ticket ($15 for single ride or $35 for unlimited) and ride the Super Bravo quad chairlift with their paraglider. The lift takes pilots 2/3 of the way up the mountain, from which it is a quick down-hike to the lower launches or a 35 minute hike to the upper launch. Hang gliders must pre-arrange shuttle with the Mountain Ops to get a ride with the UTV, utilizing a ladder strapped to the vehicle’s rack. Hang Glider rides are $20 per pilot per trip. Pilots are welcome to hike the mountain when the Super Bravo lift is not running.

Hours of lift operation:
SUMMER (Jun 27 – Sep 7)
Sun -Thu: 10 AM – 4 PM
Fri & Sat: 10 AM – 6 PM
FALL (Sep 12 – Oct 12)
Weekends and Columbus Day: 10 AM – 4 PM
FOLIAGE LIFT RIDES (Sep 28 – Oct 9)
Mon – Fri: 10 AM – 4 PM
See more at: http://www.sugarbush.com/about-vermont-resort/hours-operation-schedule#mountain

Director

Calef Letorney

Flight Description

Flight Restrictions

Pilots must have a P4/ H4.

P3/ H3 pilots may fly with an official USHPA observer that is familiar with the site.

While the site is still in a provisional phase, pilots must first coordinate with the site director and Sugarbush Mountain Ops before flying.

Flight Hazards

Sugarbush is a high mountain site with complex valleys and the associated venturi, rotor, and strong thermals. If there are thermals present there is typically significant sink, which can make it difficult to get to the LZ. The LZ is down in a hole, adjacent to the thermal generators. If possible, the preferred LZ is cross-country, over the back where there are abundant large fields. This site should only be flown by confident, experienced pilots when the weather is ideal.

Weather